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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 888 (some duplicates have been removed)
, there is no consensus. libby let us astray. we thought libya would be the example, that the foreign rescue mission would come to syria. >> i noticed that, too, that the numbers have seemed to increase. we have gone quickly from 3000, 4000, now to 5000. the u.n. said yesterday they feel there may imminently be a major crackdown. are you seeing something that accounts for these numbers escalating so fast? >> i think even those numbers may be slightly -- i think these numbers might be too low. i think we understand the terror has really increased in syria, and the center of the site -- just as they fought the battle against the muslim brotherhood of generation ago, i think assad is intent to do this in this city. one thing that is interesting about this man is that he lives in his own parallel universe. let me just read one thing from that's famous interview with barbara walters. when asked about the crackdown, the man said, "they are not my forces. they are military forces that along to the government. i do not own them. i do not own them. no government in the world kills its people unless it is led by a
there often come pained of being nationalism and some report feeling exclusion in the new libya. >> a fish -- for break nas benghazi. libya's revolution was born in this city. two years after the end of the war, the talk is politics. still. but they are not happy. fisherman anwar tells me the new government has done nothing. he even says it still feels like gaddafi's regime. others here are more rough beat, and can this bring patience? but benghazi, a how the from the dollar feeling neglected by him. >> we are unhappy because basically it's being marginalized. now the banks or politicals or all the political issues, "f"-ing with that and tripoli has nothing to do again. >> this is what's now called freedom square in benghazi. it's where libya's revolution really started with the fist demonstration back in february. people in this city believe they were spark that lit the fire. but with the power now back in tripoli, how many believe the new government has already left them behind. at a reconciliation conference in tripoli, it's clear libya's movers and shakers are now in the capital. the c
of this fight between the book tour, the regime, and his population. libya let us astray. it we thought libya would be the example the before and rescue mission would come to syria and alas, we know better. >> the numbers seem to have increased. what is happening in syria? the un says they feel or there might be imminent crackdowns. >> i think the numbers might be too low. i think we understand the terror has really increased in syria, and we see them again at the center of this fight. the senior fought the battle against the muslim brotherhood. a generation ago, i think they are determined to fight this one in the city. he really believed that he can prevail. he lives in his own parallel universe. let me read something from this famous interview. when asked about the security forces, the man says, they are not my forces. their military forces that belong to the government. i don't of them, i am president. the government in the world is killed -- no one in the world kills its own people unless they are crazy or criminal. >> he says he can get away with it because of what the russians are effe
of 20126789 he has recently relead his personal journal of e uprising in libya, translated into english t is called war without love. i'm pleased to have other friend bernard henri-levy back at this table to talk about a remarkable opportunity he had in life to affect the course of history because it was his friendship with sarkozy and his encouragement to sarkoz at france could play an important role in history that even everybody now, agrees andnderstands, helped the president of france to make a decision to intervene and then after that, others decided to intervene. so ielcome you to the program. >> thank you. >> rose: good to see you. why dow call it that title, why without love. >> i mean that it was a necessary war, a just war, as michael-- would say but even a just and necessary war is always awful. you cannot love war. i saw war. i saw it so off then my life. i saw it in libya. it is disgusting. there are some victims. but nevertheless, it was ju. it had to be waged. so that's why i gave it this title. >> rose: okay. let's tell the story even though we reflect and it before. soou
there will be a compromise. libya is barely starting the process of reconstruction. the country is still dealing with the militia. that is the situation right now. syria is entering the state of civil war. government does not want to surrender, but is quite clear it is not going to go forward either. yemen is the same situation. the government has -- the president has supposedly step down. he is playing games. he will not step down officially until elections are held, but he is not beating as someone who is being a major politick wager in his country. i am not sure how that is going to be bald. there are a lot of questions all around. >> one of the reasons we wanted to invite you back was i think we talked on this program at this table seven or eight months ago, and everyone was so excited about what was going on in egypt at the time, and you said it is not a revolution, it is just the beginning. you take out the top guy, and you are still left with everyone else who surrounded the top guy. you were very cautious at that time. >> what we're seeing now is the next step. because the military was s
and baseball courts. these of the only homes these people have for now. >> during libya's seven-month civil war, there were two cities that bore the brunt of the conflict. in misrata, they face months of attacks. later, they did the same too itre.fi's home town of sur >> these are the losers in libya's war. the price paid for living in muammar gaddafi's hometown. sitre pummeled by rebel forces. few are making a celebration here. after fleeing the fighting, this man returned home to this, he said that the new government is doing nothing to help, like many, he says that he had no time for gaddafi. amid the devastation, it is easy to find a few die-hard supporters. this man said that gaddafi protect civilians. he said the rebels, many of them from misrata, killed many in sirte. this is a tiny demonstration. they have blocked many of the main roads. people here feel that the new government is ignoring them and they are punished because of sirte's connection with gaddafi. some feel like they are living under an occupation. an occupation that is being led by their neighbors down the road in misrata.
their favorite game. >> libyas oil reserves are the biggest in africa. the industry was hit badly by the conflict. production is picking up. good news for the country's coffers, the big challenges remain. >> the oil industry in libya is on the move again. the refinery is operating at full capacity. it's a far cry from a few months ago. today, the reminders are all too clear. >> we have lost a lot of equipment. it's estimated that the damages are in the neighborhood of $10 million. >> the oil production is expected to recover to pre-four levels by the middle of next year. it's good news for a country that gets pretty much all its income from oil. as the industry tries to recover, many are asking if people will get a bigger slice of the oil wealth in the future. >> the rest has gone away. we hope that what we get from the oil will be sent to libya. >> the national transitional council says it is setting up a committee that could see a shake-up of the oil industry. not everyone is convinced. >> i do not see any change in the attitude. we still live in nepotism. if i know you, then the law does not w
as the cause. >>> secretary of defense leon panetti goes to libya and what made the trip historic and what he had to say about the country's transition to a new government. >>> and hundreds are dead after a flash flood hits the philippines, why officials believe the death toll is so high. >>> and in weather, patchy fog is developing right now across parts of the bay area and temperatures are dropping rapidly, coming up, the areas that will be sub freezing tomorrow morning and i will let you know if you have any rain clouds in the five-day forecast. >>> drivers in southern california are breathing a sigh of relief after cal tran reopened interstate 60 known as the pa mowna free way, it has been closed since wednesday after a tanker caught fire and that caused problems as drivers were forced on other freeways and there is no word on how long it will take to repair it. >>> officials identified the gunman in yesterday's shooting rampage inside of an office building in owendale, the shooter is 48-year-old andre turner. police say turner, a southern california edison employee showed up at work and
on the ground in much the same way we did in libya this year. that kind of operation limited use of force in support of a broad diplomatic objective, and that was as feasible in iraq in 1993 as it was in libya in 2011. >> you spent a lot talking about the politics in iraq, and first of all we don't hear much about what we are leaving behind in iraq. we know we are leaving, but what are we leaving behind in iraq? what is the current play in iraqi politics? >> first of all, we're leaving behind a better and more democratic iraq that exists than under saddam hussein. and nuri al maliki, the prime minister spent a lot of years in this organization, and he is by all means ruling -- you know, it's very sncentered on himself. i was reading today about the complaints that he is simply not willing to share power. there's troubling evidence that he is setting up his own sort of secret police. so it's better, but it's by no means a healthy democracy. >> and the maliki government is the most stable that has been in the post war period, i would say, and there's often be a quick succession. there's a s
's a young libyan american who tell us why she swapped the u.s. for a post-gaddafi libya. >> i was born and raised in america, and i'm 26 years old. i just came back to libya to try to live here. the economy's really bad in the u.s. it's really hard to find jobs in america, generally all over the states. being someone who speaks english is an advantage in itself here, because we're trying to bring people more globally connected, so that is an advantage in itself, and it's -- you feel like you can actually contribute here in a way that will make a huge difference. i think being libyan-american and having two nationalities as an advantage and disadvantage. definitely a huge advantage with traveling with my american passport and visa, but it's a disadvantage because i'm still seen as other in both places kind of. so, like here in libya, i'm not seen as -- i'm not seen the same as libyans who were born and raised here, like my cousins, because i did not go through the same experiences they went through. everybody's had their eye on the deal for the past nine months, so there's a fact of inv
. how street art has flourished since the fall of libya's dictator. >> in the united kingdom, the numbers for three-quarters of butterfly species have declined. the most likely explanation is that butterflies are losing their conditional homes. >> the latest stock take of the uk's butterfly numbers is based on data over a decade. researchers have been looking at how widespread they are. the study. finding is that 72% of the uk's butterflies have seen their numbers falling. among the biggest decline, a rare species. the population is down by 70%. it is also found in fewer areas. researchers believe the key factor behind a pole in so many species is the lack of or deterioration of habitat. they found it's not just the rare butterflies that have declined. >> the declines are much broader. a lot of the species we're worried about have continued to decline. we have reversed these declines quite well. >> among the success stories, the large blue, once its stake in the u.k. -- once extinct in the u.k. >> it is a scene you would normally see in a movie, but this time it was for real.
cases, not so much. in libya and egypt, yes. in syria, no. we have seen u.s. forces pull out of iraq but stay in afghanistan. we have seen the death of north korean tyrant who has been our enemy for his entire lifetime. do we hear any domestic conversation about it? do these events drive any of the conversation we've been having in 2011? >> not really, gwen. from my standpoint, the most theppointing thing about republican campaign as a foreign policy one is that there really hasn't been a coherent foreign policy debate here. there's been a series of attempts to take shots at president obama, and at times that has put the republican candidates in paradoxical positions, in the case of newt gingrich, being in favor of intervening in libya a week before he was against intervening in libya. gwen: the president poked back at mitt romney by saying, ask bin laden whether i've been too easy or not. and to take an issue that should be core to most americans, afghanistan. how long are we going to be in afghanistan? what's the strategy going to be? mitt romney has answers, newt has some answers
of time. there could be further spasms of violence. syria is a different country than libya. in libya, there was a limited military intervention. that offer does not exist at present. you do not have a consensus within the region. the impending arab league observer mission is still very important. >> do you have faith? >> over time, in the case of libya, you still a crystallization of public opinion. quickly. this is in slow motion. it could get to the point where there is further intervention, but we're not there yet. >> thank you very much. among the countries taking a leading role in pushing for change in syria has been turkey. relations between the two have soured. syrian troops had shot at turkish vehicles. the free-trade agreement has been abolished. our correspondent has been after the area to assess the fallout. >> turkey closed its economic success to many things. among them, this factory. much of it goes to the middle east. the only convenient route is a press syria. that has become more expensive and dangerous. >> we export a lot of our products through syria. and now we ar
country than libya. in libya, there was an effective military intervention. that does not exist at present because you primarily to not have a consensus within the region. impending arab league observer mission is still very important. >> do you have faith? >> whereas in the case of libya and saudi crystallization, it could get to the point where there is more involvement from the international community in the region. we are not there yet. >> thank you. among the countries taking a leading role in the push for change in syria, turkey. unsurprisingly, relations between the two have soured. the free trade agreement has been abolished. and what was a flourishing trade agreement has been broken. our correspondent has been to the area to assess the fallout. >> turkey owes its economic success to many things. among them, pasta. this factory is in exports to italy. and much of it goes to the middle east. >> we have exported a lot of our products to syria. we hope to be sending thank you -- pasta to 11 on. >> it is uncharacteristically quiet these days. >> try to imagine what this was like just a
. there could be spasms of violence. syria is a different country than libya. in libya, there was an effective military intervention. that does not exist at present because you primarily to not have a consensus within the region. impending arab league observer mission is still very important. >> do you have faith? >> whereas in the case of libya and saudi crystallization, it could get to the point where there is more involvement from the international community in the region. we are not there yet. >> thank you. among the countries taking a leading role in the push for change in syria, turkey. unsurprisingly, relations between the two have soured. the free trade agreement has been abolished. and what was a flourishing trade agreement has been broken. our correspondent has been to the area to assess the fallout. >> turkey owes its economic success to many things. among them, pasta. this factory is in exports to italy. and much of it goes to the middle east. >> we have exported a lot of our products to syria. we hope to be sending thank you -- pasta to 11 on. >> it is uncharacteristically quiet t
sitting down in libya. the new libya prime minister, panetta said they are confident they are achieving a unified libya. much more on these and top stories and a interview with ann coulter. that is more coming up. stay with us. first half billion solyndra debacle and first solar. latest green energy country that is having trouble. they are warning that sales and profits are fading. john, you say this is evidence of them to stop using tax dollars. >> there is a role of government to build long-term dc lines and let free markets work. that's a level playing field. the government is playing venture capitolist. that is the hardest form of investing. and our government is unsuccessful and they are picking winners and losers based on the political connections and that is what is wrong. what they are doing is wrong. >> wayne, i know the stock is down seven percent. there is a free market for you. john is right. taking taxpayer money anding it in there. we can't compete and be there. and half of the guts of the cell phone are made somewhere else and not in the united states. we have to compete
away, another revolution begins in libya. >> we are the first television crew to get to this city. and we were just overwhelmed by the welcome here. people were throwing candy inside the car, clapping, shaking our hands, telling us you're welcome. thank you for coming here. an incredible experience. >> the uprising against kadhafi turns into a 7-month war. a message of total kadhafi control. >> and this is really what the libyan government wants to get out. this message that here in the capital, triply, support for kadhafi is strong, support for his government is strong. >> nato begins its campaign to protect libyan civilians. the battle on the ground intensifies. >> this is proving to be a much tougher battle that anyone had anticipated. this city, key territory, should the pro-kadhafi elements be able to push in here, the concern is that this could potentially turn into a blood bath. >> there's gunfire all around us and we believe that kadhafi's forces are doing a round about movements. so we are rushing out of this area. >> we're going as fast as we can. >> as the fight draws c
panetti goes to libya and what made the trip historic and what he had to say about the country's transition to a new government. >>> and hundreds are dead after a flash flood hits the philippines, why officials believe the death toll is so high. >>> and in weather, patchy fog is developing right now across parts [ female announcer ] what would you call an ordinary breakfast pastry that's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strudel. so delicious...so fun. mom, we're dying. no you're not, you're just hungry. make some totino's pizza rolls. we don't have any! front... left, totino's. [ male announcer ] well done mom! less drama, more fun! totino's pizza rolls. >>> drivers in southern california are breathing a sigh of relief after cal tran reopened interstate 60 known as the pa mowna free way, it has been closed since wednesday after a tanker caught fire and that caused problems as drivers were forced on other freeways and there is no word on how long it will take
fighters in libya. one source says they're ready to strike and their targets may be well beyond libya's borders. what is this about? cnn's nic robertson is following these latest developments and he joins us from london by phone. so, the reports are that al qaeda sent a pointman to libya back in may and he was charged with putting together this al qaeda fighting force in libya, right, nick? >> exactly. it's long been a concern as instability increased in libya, gadhafi was forced out as the ncc was unable to consolidate a government that al qaeda included were trying to gain a foothold on what has happened here is that the head of al qaeda has sent two fop litop lieutenants to libya to set up camps there. one of them was captured as he was passing through europe and the other one made it. the man who has made it, who has made it to libya who has established this camp has a track record of being a radical islamist who is known to have, even in al qaeda circles, to have very radical views. he was in training camps in afghanistan in the 1990s. he has been a close ally of al and you have
, event of the year for the president? >> easy to say bin laden but i'm going libya and qaddafi because it was a risk, the policy was a risk and it is a policy that is going to doe fine what future presidents do, how they handle situations like this. chris: lead from behind? >> it was in a weird way as big of a gamble and maybe even a bigger gamble long term on the impact it could have had on short-term american policy. chris: and hillary clinton and susan rice -- >> the women of the foreign power team but this was also about the when united states signs a pact to be an ally with a country like france and a country like great britain, and we always ask them to be with america when we go there, this was a case where we had to stand when they needed it and we did what we provided. chris: very interesting. you had an expression there a moment ago. >> i know i did. chris: katty kay, i don't know whether it's dismay or what it was. what's your reaction? >> it was surprise. because the libya conflict lasted so much longer than people expected. because it tied up american forces and money at a
ties overseas. pentagon chief leon panetta arriving in libya engaging in historic talks there. national security correspondent jennifer griffin traveling with the secretary in libya. >> reporter: this is first trip that u.s. secretary of defense ever made to libya. it comes days after armed militia tried to assassinate the head of libya's army. they consolidated the competing militias is top. here where u.s. sailors were buried in 1804 he laid a wreath. he was on board intrepid to put an end to the pirate raids affecting ships in. the bodies floated to shore and was dragged through the streets of trip to 207 years ago. the seller terry mass been maintained since then but a move by family members to get the remains has gained steam in congress. new defense authorization bill has a provision in it that would require the defense secretary to study the possibility of returning these remains home. for now, 13 u.s. sailors remain interred here in tripoli. fox. >> gregg: jennifer griffin reporting from libya. >> heather: new violence unfolding in egypt. hundreds of rock throwing anti-military
plans for new inquiry, they're thinking about sending investigators to libya to talk to witnesses and to seek new evidence for a possible second trial. what do you make of this 23 years later? >> i think it's wonderful. i think we should have -- they should definitely do this, send people over. there are lots of questions asked. they should be looking into the case against fema, the other person indicted, and because scotland has changed its law now, and it's no longer an issue of double jeopardy, they also should be looking much, much higher, because i think there are people who must know in libya how this was done, how it was planned, and who else was involved. mcra he, who -- megrahi who placed the bomb was the lower part of this. we must find out the names and get information and possible trials on all of the others who were involved in this ghastly crime. alisyn: susan, why has it taken 23 years to get more names and do a more thorough investigation? >> well, of course, because of this situation in libya, now libya has changed and i am so happy about that. it is theo it has m
inarticulation on libya and china and other things combined with that. that's why newt gingrich, despite the baggage that he has, is over -- seems to be overcoming all of that is because newt seems to be right on the policy area when asked about it. >> listen. like i said, you can't take an 11 second pause on libya. have you got to say something even if it says libya, libya, libya on the label label label. something. have you got to come up with something. >> anything. i think people are longing for that gingrich barack obama debate like they're longing for floyd may weather, manny packwell. they want to see that and put that on pay per view. we could stop the deficit right there. >> bill: do you think though as we were talking about that independent voters are more likely to support gingrich over romney? i think romney might have an advantage in those precincts. >> as barack obama continues to ostracize himself and estrange himself from other otherwise moderate people he has a chance. maybe i can't go to gingrich. they are actively getting angry at him. guess what? the president's appro
correspondents. libya 2011 brought incredible change there. forces took on moammar gadhafi. ultimately won with the help of nato. david and goliath story, if ever there was one. matthew chance became a prisoner in his hotel. >> we've been living in fear for five days. we are being held against our will by tease crazy gunmen. >> the disaster that left 15,000 dead in japan. a monster tsunami. back then, he had something more important to do. he wasn't focused on his future but fortunately, somebody else was. at usaa we provide retirement solutions for our military, veterans and their families. from investments... to life insurance... to health care options. learn more with our free usaa retirement guide. call 877-242-usaa. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 888 (some duplicates have been removed)

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